ţʵ

blow noun

1 act of blowing

VERB + BLOW give sth Give your nose a blow.

2 hard knock that hits sb/sth

ADJ. hard, heavy, nasty, painful, powerful, severe, sharp, stinging, violent | fatal, final, mortal | glancing, light Jack caught him a glancing blow on the jaw. | single He killed the man with a single blow of his cricket bat.

QUANT. flurry, hail The man went down in a hail of blows.

VERB + BLOW get, receive, suffer, take He suffered a severe blow to the head. | catch sb, deal sb, deliver, give sb, land, rain (down), strike sb It was the gardener who delivered the fatal blow. She landed a nasty blow on his nose. He rained heavy blows on the old woman. | exchange The boys exchanged blows with the police. | come to The children came to blows over the new toy. | aim She aimed a blow at Lucy. | avoid, deflect, dodge, parry, ward off

BLOW + VERB fall, land The blow landed on my right shoulder.

PREP. ~ of two blows of the axe | ~ on a nasty blow on the head | ~ to a blow to the victim's chest

3 sudden shock/disappointment

ADJ. big, great, major, serious, severe, terrible | bitter, crippling, cruel, crushing, devastating, knock-out | double | decisive, mortal a mortal blow to British industry | body

VERB + BLOW deal (sb/sth), deliver, strike His defeat dealt a crushing blow to the party. | receive, suffer | cushion, soften to soften the blow of tax increases | come as The news came as a bitter blow to the staff.

BLOW + VERB come, fall The blow came at a meeting on Saturday.

PREP. ~ for A tax on books would be a body blow for education. | ~ to Her decision to live abroad was a terrible blow to her parents.

PHRASES a bit of a blow